Work & Employment

Western Cape APD believes that meaningful participation in vocational activities leads to the economic empowerment of persons with disabilities and enables them to achieve a maximum level of independence and integration into the community. Western Cape APD has seen that in relation to other challenges, access to skills development and employment for persons with disabilities, especially persons with intellectual disabilities, remains extremely limited and deprives them of taking their rightful place in the socio-economic life of South Africa. According to V Patel, persons with disabilities “…are more likely to slide into poverty due to stigma and exclusion from social and economic opportunities” (Patel V. Poverty, inequality, and mental health in developing countries. In: Leon DAWG, editor. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 2001. p. 247-62). Social and economic exclusion of persons living with disabilities does not affect the individual alone, but results in high economic dependency on family members, relatives, APD Branches and government. Stigmatized by misconceptions and popular myths, persons with disability are relegated to the periphery of society, denying them a sense of fulfilment and contribution to society, which further disables them.

With the Work & Employment programme, WCAPD aims to build the capacity of APD Branches and other service providers to provide accesible and inclusive opportunities to persons with disabilities to:
• Develop their full work potential
• Enable them to enter the open-labour market,
• Develop their own entrepreneur unit,
• Become productive workers within a Skills and Work Centre or
• Become part of a community based activity group.

Skills and Work Centres

The Skills and Work Centre is described by Department of Social Development’s revised policy on Skills and Work Centres for Persons with Disability (2019) as...

Adult Inclusion Screening Tool

AIST, an acronym for Adult Inclusion Screening Tool, was designed specifically for WCAPD by Louise Fouche Occupational Therapy...

Adult Inclusion Drive Assessment

AIDA is an acronym for Adult Inclusion Drive Assessment used to determine the functional capacity of a person with a disability...

Skills and Work Centres

The Skills and Work Centre is described by Department of Social Development’s revised policy on Skills and Work Centres for Persons with Disability (2019) as:

A SWC focuses on developing the skills and abilities of persons with disabilities to enable them to participate in mainstream economic life as employees in the OLM or as workers in supported employment programmes.

In addition to restoring dignity and respect for the abilities of persons with disabilities and improving their quality of life, a SWC ensures an equalization of the rights of persons with disabilities.

The transformation of protective workshops into SWCs will embed the psychosocial development of persons with disabilities, as well as their inclusion in mainstream economic growth and development as important role-players."

• become productive workers within a Skills and Work Centre;
• supplement their income through profit sharing;
• enter the open-labour market where applicable;
• develop and maintain a fully functional business enterprise, operating in accordance with economic principles to yield a profitable return;
• invest any profitable returns into programs and projects focused on the continuation and further development of pyscho social services to persons with disabilities. ​

Adult Inclusion Screening Tool (AIST) for Skills & Work Centres (Protective Workshops)

AIST, an acronym for Adult Inclusion Screening Tool, was designed specifically for WCAPD by Louise Fouche Occupational Therapy. AIST was designed with the specific purpose of determining if a person with a disability will benefit from participation in a Skills and Work Centre (previously known as a Protective Workshop), or would rather benefit from participating in an Adult Day Care Program.

The aim of the AIST screening tool is to determine:
i) YES, the person with a disability can function in a Skills and Work Centre or
ii) NO, the person with a disability will not cope in the Skills and Work Centre and needs to be referred to either rehabilitation services or an adult day care centre.

Although the information gained from this screening tool can inform and guide a person with a disability’s goals or task selection, once he/she is admitted to a SWC, this screening tool is NOT comprehensive enough to set up an all-inclusive IDP, as numerous areas have NOT been assessed as part of the AIST screening tool.

This AIST screening tool was designed to be administered by social workers, social auxiliary workers, home-based carers, community care workers, special or adult care staff and SWC workshop managers who are familiar with persons with disabilities.

Adult Inclusion Drive Assessment (AIDA) for Skills & Work Centres (Protective Workshops)

AIDA is an acronym for Adult Inclusion Drive Assessment used to determine the functional capacity of a person with a disability. The AIDA was designed and developed to determine a person with a disability’s level of motivation/ drive in order to place him/her in the appropriate SWC according to their level of motivation.

The AIST determined only Yes or No for the inclusion to a SWC program. This AIDA is slightly more complex because it is used to determine which level a persons with disability’s drive is on through checking their action within the collage making.

This is a screening tool and is NOT comprehensive MoCA assessment or a Functional Capacity Evaluation. This implies that the screening tool will be able to give a good indication which level of drive each person with a disability is on and therefore indicate which Work and Employment programme they should be included in.

The AIDA relies on the screening administrators’ acute observations skills and was designed to be administered by social workers, auxiliary social workers and SWC workshop managers who are familiar with people with disabilities. The AIDA tool should only be used by staff who are familiar with the SWC programmes, otherwise the matching between the level of drive and the most appropriate SWC programme may not be accurate.