Awareness Raising

Inclusion for All

Awareness Raising

Disability awareness raising is crucial for promoting inclusivity, understanding, and support for persons with disabilities and their families. It's imperative that disability awareness raising activities should be ongoing and integrated into every aspect of society to create a more inclusive and accessible South Africa. Persons with disabilities themselves are trained in public speaking and are encouraged to share their story in an effort to combat incorrect perceptions.WCAPD provides ample opportunities to members of the public, corporates and service providers to support and engage in awareness raising activities and play an active part in creating an inclusive and accessible tomorrow for all.

• Disability awareness workshops
• Disability sensitisation
• Disability awareness campaigns
• Accessibility assessments and awareness raising (events and spaces)
• Education and training
• Advocacy and lobbying
• Disability awareness days
• Accessible information
• Community outreach programs
• Collaboration with other service providers within the disability sector

Please reach out to our offices at Tel. 021 555 2881 or email director@wcapd.org.za for more information on your local APD Awareness raising initiatives.

#OneLess Program

#1Less spinal cord injury

Distracted driving is a contributing factor to the incidence of road crashes with resulting injuries, fatalities and disabilities. Greater awareness of the dangers of distracted driving, as well as the education of drivers on driver safety, would go a long way towards decreasing the high fatality rate on South African roads.

There are very few disabilities that are preventable - irresponsible driving leading to disability is certainly preventable. It is a well-known fact that texting while driving is an increasing global trend, and South Africa is no exception. It is said that cellphones are responsible for 1.6 million crashes per year, causing over 500 000 injuries and 6 000 deaths.

According to the Automobile Association of South Africa, an international survey amongst 837 drivers with cell phones found that almost half swerved or drifted into another lane, 23% had tailgated, 21% cut someone off and 18% nearly hit another vehicle while using the phone.

Young South African drivers, especially, are far more likely than their European counterparts to be distracted by phone calls and internet use while behind the wheel, according to the results of Goodyear's third annual Road Safety Survey. The survey addressed the road behavior's of 6400 drivers under the age of 25 in 15 European countries as well as in South Africa. The survey showed that while new technology undoubtedly provides a particular danger, some of the most common behavior's contributing to distracted driving included -
drinking (75% compared to the global average of 58%);
• eating (71% compared to the global average of 45%);
• looking at a map, changing GPS settings, shaving, putting on make-up, styling hair and even kissing (33%!)
• more traditional multi-tasking activities also continue to distract young drivers, with South Africans amongst the most easily misled.

Disability and fatalities arising from accidents caused by distracted driving is close to our hearts. There is not a moment to lose in doing all we can to curb the global rise in the incidence of disability.

We invite you to join us in working towards a safer transport environment, both for the road user and pedestrians. The direct impact this would have is to save lives in a time when just one life is too many. The emotional impact of this project is immeasurable - how do you measure the grief of a family who has lost a loved one due to a simple text message?

Help us to raise awareness by
• signing our pledge to not drive distracted;
• share it on your social media using the hashtag #1Less;
• encourage your family and friends to do the same.

Please reach out to our offices at Tel. 021 555 2881 or email director@wcapd.org.za for more information and/or participation in the #OneLessSpinalInjury Program.

#OneLess Program

#OneLessNappyNeeded

Nappies are very expensive and persons with disabilities with bowel and urinary incontinence very often do not have the financial resources to provide in this need. Persons with disabilities are often denied access to day care centres, schools and employment opportunities if they cannot use the bathroom independently.

The #One Less Nappy Needed is a program of Western Cape APD and its registered branches to create awareness among the public about the need for nappies by children and adults with disabilities and to encourage them to collect and donate nappies to those in need.

The #OneLessNappy is an annual event that runs from October to November and can take the form of a fun walk/run or schools/companies can act as a drop off point where members of the public can donate nappies. The nappies collected will be distributed amongst beneficiaries who are registered clients of an APD branch.

Please reach out to our offices at Tel. 021 555 2881 or email director@wcapd.org.za for more information and/or participation in a #OneLessNappy event near you.

Did you know?

• 15% of the population has a disability
• Less than 1% of SA’s workforce are people with disabilities.
• Stigmatisation and inaccessibility remain the biggest challenges for inclusion.

These bespoke awareness campaigns are a creative way in which to focus the attention of businesses on the daily challenges facing persons with disabilities in their everyday life, particularly in the workplace. What better way to understand someone else than to spend time in their footsteps!

Walk in my Wheels

The Walk in my Wheels campaign was initiated in response to the growing need for wheelchair accessibility in the built environment (specifically in places of employment) and greater understanding of people with disabilities in business surroundings. Business leaders who spend a few hours in someone else’s shoes (so to speak!) automatically experience life from a different perspective, bringing home the unique daily challenges of wheelchair users.

The campaign aims to –
• Create awareness on the challenges of wheelchair users in the workplace
• Highlight the barriers that exist in the workplace
• Give business owners and employers the opportunity to assess their premises from the point of view of a wheelchair user
• Promote the employment of persons with disabilities

You will be asked to –
• Spend 4 consecutive hours in a wheelchair, going about your daily tasks;
• Complete a list of designated tasks
• Write a brief, structured report on your experience
• Partner with APD in identifying ways in which to establish greater inclusion for persons with disabilities in your organisation.

This has been an eye-opener in previous projects and has been followed up with sensitisation of the company’s employees and discussions around making their premises more wheelchair friendly.

Please reach out to our offices at Tel. 021 555 2881 or email director@wcapd.org.za for more information and/or participation in the Walk in my Wheels Program.

See with my ears

The See with my Ears campaign challenges business owners, directors and managers to view life (so to speak!) using only their ears.

We will ask you -
• To spend 4 consecutive hours blindfolded
• Complete a list of designated tasks
• Write a brief, structured report on your experience

Partner with WCAPD in identifying ways in which to establish greater in-clusion for persons with disabilities in your organisation

Please reach out to our offices at Tel. 021 555 2881 or email director@wcapd.org.za for more information and/or participation in the See with my ears program.

Hear with my eyes

Many people are unaware of the daily challenges faced by persons with disabilities, particularly in public spaces. Hear with my Eyes invites you to spend 2—4 hours with earplugs, doing what you usually do. You will find that even simple daily tasks take on a whole new meaning and will give you valuable insight into the lived experience of people with a hearing impairment. In this way, we hope to inspire you to include the needs of persons with disabilities in your business, thereby leading and influencing others until, finally, society can become a better and more inclusive place for all, including persons with disabilities!

What does your participation in Hear with my eyes involve?
• On an agreed upon day, we ask that you spend two to four continuous hours with earplugs, which will be provided by ourselves.
• You are encouraged to continue with your usual tasks, but also to complete a list of designated tasks tailored to suit your daily schedule.
• You are welcome to have one helper from within your organisation to assist you during performance of your tasks, if necessary
• You will be asked to write a short, structured report on your experiences without hearing within your organisation.
• Based on your report, we will partner with you to identify ways to establish greater inclusion for per-sons with disabilities in your organisation.

This has been an eye-opener in previous projects and has been followed up with sensitisation of the company’s employees and discussions around making their premises more wheelchair friendly.

Please reach out to our offices at Tel. 021 555 2881 or email director@wcapd.org.za for more information and/or participation in the Hear with my eyes program.

Casual Day

Casual Day is the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD)’s flagship awareness and fundraising project and supported by WCAPD and APD Branches. It is a widely celebrated national campaign that occurs annually in South Africa, usually on the first Friday of September. Your contribution of R20.00 for a Casual Day sticker entitles you to express your individual interpretation of the yearly theme through your outfits, showing your support for the full inclusion and equity of persons with disabilities.

Please reach out to our offices at Tel. 021 555 2881 or email director@wcapd.org.za for more information or participation in Casual Day celebrations in your area.